Doctor examining sick child in face mask for rsv virus

RSV is on the Rise

RSV, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, and other respiratory illnesses are on the rise in our communities.

For most children, RSV is NOT a medical emergency. Runny nose, congestion, cough, and fevers are common at this time and should be carefully monitored with rest, fluids, and fever reducers. But how do you know when your child’s cold symptoms have become more serious?  When should you call the clinic, and when should you bring them to the hospital?

When in doubt, it’s always ok to talk to your provider. Call or go online to schedule an appointment for an in-person or virtual visit or ask a question about your child’s symptoms.

CONTACT your medical provider if your child:

  • Continues to have cough, congestion for more than 10-14 days.
  • Is wheezing or having pain with coughing but is not having trouble breathing.
  • Has prolonged fever more than 3-4 days and higher than 100.4°
  • Is vomiting and unable to keep fluids down for a day. Is having trouble feeding or less wet diapers.
  • Will not take any oral fluids for more than 12 hours or is having less than 3 wet diapers in 24 hours.
  • Is fussy, unable to sleep well, tugs at ears or has ear drainage.

Bring your child to the Emergency Department if he or she is unresponsive or has:

  • Trouble breathing (ribs sucking in with breathing, flaring nostrils when breathing, pauses breathing, audible wheezing, or is unable to feed normally due to breathing problems).
  • Fever of higher than 100.4°F for more than 5 days in a row.
  • Listlessness or lethargy (is not alert or responding to you normally) especially after being given a fever-reducing medication.
  • An underlying medical condition like asthma or heart disease and your specialist wants them seen.
  • A recommendation from your pediatrician to be seen in the emergency department.
  • A change in skin color: is pale, blue or gray especially around the lips, hands and feet.

For more information, access the Masks are Down, Colds are Up article on the hereforlife.blog.